Amiad Cohen

Amiad Cohen

Amiad Cohen is the CEO of the Tikvah Fund in Israel, publisher of the Hebrew-language Hashiloach journal, and a partner in several business initiatives in the security and technology fields. He served as deputy commander of the elite “Egoz” unit in the Israel Defense Forces and for several years was head of security coordination in his native settlement of Eli. He previously directed the industrial and fiscal innovation divisions of the Mateh Binyamin Regional Council.

Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts is a British historian and journalist. He is Visiting Professor at the War Studies Department at King’s College, London, and the Lehrman Institute Lecturer at the New-York Historical Society. He is also the Roger and Martha Mertz Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Roberts has written or edited nineteen books, which have been translated into 22 languages, and appears regularly on radio and television around the world. His most recent book, a biography of Sir Winston Churchill, Churchill: Walking With Destiny, became a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller, was translated into eight languages, and won the ICS Churchill Award for Literacy. Roberts sits on the boards or advisory councils of a number of think tanks and advocacy groups, including Policy Exchange, The Centre for Policy Studies, and The Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

Daniel Mark

Daniel Mark

Daniel Mark is the former Chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom and is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Villanova University, where he has taught since 2013. He teaches political theory, philosophy of law, American political thought, and politics and religion. At Villanova, he is a Faculty Associate of the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the Study of Free Institutions and the Public Good, and he holds the rank of Battalion Professor in Villanova’s Navy Reserve Officers’ Training Corps unit. Dr. Mark is a Fellow of the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton, NJ, and works with the Tikvah Fund. He is an Affiliated Scholar of the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights and the American Founding in Washington, DC, and he has taught at the Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University. In addition to his academic writing, Dr. Mark has published on topics related to international religious freedom in US News & World ReportInvestor’s Business DailyForeign Affairs, the Hill, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, and he has appeared on CNN, Al Jazeera America, CBS radio in Philadelphia, KNUS radio in Denver, and Relevant Radio, among other outlets.

Eric Cohen

Eric Cohen

Eric Cohen is the Co-Chairman of the Jewish Leadership Conference and has been the Executive Director of the Tikvah Fund since 2007. He was the founder and remains Editor-at-Large of the New Atlantis, serves as the Executive Director of the Jewish Review of Books, and is the publisher of Mosaic. He currently serves on the boards of directors of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, the Witherspoon Institute, and National Affairs and on the Editorial Advisory Board of First Things. Mr. Cohen has published in numerous academic and popular journals, magazines, and newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Weekly StandardCommentary, the New RepublicFirst Things, and numerous others. He is the author of In the Shadow of Progress: Being Human in the Age of Technology (2008) and co-editor of The Future is Now: America Confronts the New Genetics (2002). He was previously Managing Editor of the Public Interest and served as a Senior Consultant to the President’s Council on Bioethics.

Henry Kissinger

Henry Kissinger

Henry Kissinger served as the fifty-sixth Secretary of State of the United States from 1973 to 1977. He also served as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs from January 20, 1969, until November 3, 1975. At present, Dr. Kissinger is Chairman of Kissinger Associates, Inc., an international consulting firm. He is also a member of the International Council of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.; a Counselor to and Trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies; an Honorary Governor of the Foreign Policy Association; and an Honor Member of the International Olympic Committee. Dr. Kissinger was awarded a Bronze Star from the U.S. Army in 1945; the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973; the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977; and the Medal of Liberty in 1986. The author of over a dozen books, he has also published numerous articles on United States foreign policy, international affairs, and diplomatic history.

John Podhoretz

John Podhoretz

John Podhoretz is the editor of Commentary magazine and a columnist at the New York Post. Previously, he has served as speechwriter to Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. He appears regularly on television as a political commentator on outlets such as Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC.

Jonathan Silver

Jonathan Silver

Jonathan Silver is the Executive Director of the Jewish Leadership Conference and is a Senior Director at the Tikvah Fund, where he has conducted scores of interviews with Jewish intellectuals, political figures, rabbis, and writers as the host of the Tikvah Podcast on Great Jewish Essays and Ideas. He was educated at Tufts University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and holds a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Georgetown University.

 

Malcolm Hoenlein

Malcolm Hoenlein

Malcolm Hoenlein has been the Executive Vice Chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, the coordinating body on international and national concerns for 52 national Jewish organizations, since 1986. Previously, he served as the founding Executive Director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater New York, and prior to that, he was the founding Executive Director of the Greater New York Conference on Soviet Jewry. Hoenlein has written and lectured across the U.S. and abroad on international relations, Israel and Middle East affairs, Soviet and world Jewry, terrorism, the American Jewish community, and intergroup relations. He is Chairman of America’s Voices in Israel and Co-Chair of the Secure Community Network and serves on the boards of directors or advisory boards of several companies.

Mark Rienzi

Mark Rienzi

Mark L. Rienzi serves as President of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty and is a Professor at the Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law. Professor Rienzi teaches constitutional law, religious liberty, torts, and evidence. His litigation and research interests focus on the First and Fourteenth Amendments, with an emphasis on free speech and the free exercise of religion. His scholarship on these issues has appeared in a variety of prestigious journals including the Harvard Law Review, Fordham Law Review, Emory Law Journal, Notre Dame Law Review, and George Mason Law Review. As a litigator, Professor Rienzi has represented a range of parties asserting First Amendment claims in courts across the country. His writings on constitutional issues have been published the New York Times, Washington Times, and USA Today.

 

Michael Doran

Michael Doran

Michael Doran is a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C. and is a specialist in Middle East security issues. In the administration of President George W. Bush, Doran served in the White House as a Senior Director in the National Security Council as well as a Senior Advisor in the State Department and a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense in the Pentagon. He was previously a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and held teaching positions at NYU, Princeton, and the University of Central Florida. He is the author of several books—most recently, Ike’s Gamble— and has published extensively in Foreign Affairs, the American Interest, Commentary, Mosaic, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and the New York Times.

Moshe Koppel

Moshe Koppel

Moshe Koppel is Chairman of the Kohelet Policy Forum, serves on the board of directors of the Tikvah Fund, and is a member of the Department of Computer Science at Bar-Ilan University. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Courant Institute at NYU and did post-doctoral work at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Dr. Koppel’s main areas of research in computer science include machine learning and social choice theory. His work on authorship attribution is used widely in commercial, legal, and security applications. Dr. Koppel has also published two books and many articles on Rabbinic literature, with a special emphasis on logic and probability; he also co-founded and co-edited the journal Higayon, which is devoted to these topics. Dr. Koppel’s political activity includes co-drafting two proposed constitutions for Israel, including a joint proposal with Michael Eitan, formerly chairman of the Knesset’s Constitution and Law committee. Several laws that Dr. Koppel drafted have been passed by the Knesset.

Neomi Rao

Neomi Rao

Judge Neomi Rao was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in March 2019. She graduated from Yale College in 1995 and the University of Chicago Law School in 1999. Following graduation, she served as a law clerk to Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and, in the 2001 October Term, as law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas of the U.S. Supreme Court. Between her clerkships, Judge Rao served as counsel for nominations and constitutional law to the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. In 2002, she joined the international arbitration group of Clifford Chance LLP in London, England. From 2005-2006, she served as Special Assistant and Associate White House Counsel to President George W. Bush. From 2006 to 2017, Judge Rao was a professor at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where she taught constitutional law, legislation and statutory interpretation, and the history and foundations of the administrative state. In 2014, she founded the Center for the Study of the Administrative State, a non-profit Center that promoted academic scholarship and public policy debates about administrative law. In July 2017, she was appointed to serve as the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget. She served in this position until her appointment to the D.C. Circuit.

Norman Podhoretz

Norman Podhoretz

Norman Podhoretz was born in 1930 in Brownsville, Brooklyn to immigrant Jewish parents and attended Boys High School in Bedford-Stuyvesant. He received a full scholarship to Columbia College, where he became a protégé of Lionel Trilling and received his B.A. in English literature in 1950. Concurrently, he earned a B.A. in Hebrew literature from the Jewish Theological Seminary. He was awarded a Kellett Fellowship and a Fulbright Scholarship and received a B.A. in Literature (1st) and an M.A. from Clare College, Cambridge. From 1953-1955, he served in the U.S. Army. In 1960 Mr. Podhoretz became Editor-in-Chief of Commentary magazine; he remained in that position until his retirement in 1995. He has been an adviser to the U.S. Information Agency and a Senior Fellow of the Hudson Institute. In 2004 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush. Mr. Podhoretz’s books and articles include Why Are Jews Liberals? (2009), World War IV: The Long Struggle Against Islamofascism (2004), The Prophets: Who They Were, What They Are (2002), Ex-Friends (1999), The Bloody Crossroads: Where Literature and Politics Meet (1986), Why We Were in Vietnam (1982), The Present Danger: Do We Have the Will to Reverse the Decline of American Power? (1980), Breaking Ranks: A Political Memoir (1979), Making It (1967), “My Negro Problem and Ours” (1964), “Hannah Arendt on Eichman: A Study in the Perversity of Brilliance” (1963), and “Israel, a Lamentation from the Future” (1989). He is the 2019 Herzl Prize Laureate.

Rabbi Meir Y. Soloveichik

Rabbi Meir Y. Soloveichik

Meir Y. Soloveichik is Director of the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University and the Rabbi of Congregation Shearith Israel, the oldest Jewish congregation in the United States. Prior to this, Rabbi Soloveichik served as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun in Manhattan. Rabbi Soloveichik has lectured throughout the United States, in Europe, and in Israel to both Jewish and non-Jewish audiences on topics relating to Jewish theology, bioethics, wartime ethics, and Jewish-Christian relations. His essays on these subjects have appeared in Mosaic, the Wall Street JournalCommentaryFirst Things, Azure, Tradition, and the Torah U-Madda Journal. In August 2012, he gave the invocation at the opening session of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida. He is the son of Rabbi Eliyahu Soloveichik, grandson of the late Rabbi Ahron Soloveichik, and the great nephew of the late Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik.

Rabbi Yehoshua Pfeffer

Rabbi Yehoshua Pfeffer

Yehoshua Pfeffer is a rabbi and former dayan (religious judge), specializing in monetary law. He currently heads the haredi division at the Tikvah Fund in Israel, teaches at Yeshivas Chedvas HaTorah, and is Editor-in-Chief of the new Tzarich Iyun (“Needs Further Study”) online journal. Pfeffer has written numerous books and articles on different subjects of Jewish law and thought; lectures extensively for various forums in Israel and abroad; and has served as chief halachic assistant to the former Chief Rabbi of Israel and as a researcher for the Israel Law Ministry. He holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Law from Hebrew University, and clerked at the Supreme Court of Israel. He lectures at Hebrew University and at Ono Academic College.

Roger Hertog

Roger Hertog

Roger Hertog is the Co-Chairman of the Jewish Leadership Conference, President of the Hertog Foundation, and Chairman of the Tikvah Fund. One of the founding partners of the investment research and management firm Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., which he joined in 1968, Mr. Hertog served as the firm’s President before its merger with Alliance Capital Management in 2000. In 2006, he retired from the successor company, AllianceBernstein, and is currently Vice-Chairman Emeritus. An alumnus of the City College of New York, Mr. Hertog was previously Chairman of The New-York Historical Society and The Manhattan Institute; he has also served on the boards of the American Enterprise Institute, the New York Philharmonic, the New York Public Library, the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, and the Washington Institute for Near-East Policy. In 2007, Mr. Hertog was awarded the Medal of the National Endowment for the Humanities in recognition of his philanthropic efforts. In 2010, he received the William E. Simon Prize for Philanthropic Leadership.

Russ Roberts

Russ Roberts

Russell Roberts is the John and Jean De Nault Research Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. Roberts hosts the weekly podcast EconTalk, whose past guests include Milton Friedman, Thomas Pikkety, Nassim Taleb, and Christopher Hitchens. He is the author of How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness, and several other books. A three-time teacher of the year, Roberts has taught at various universities including George Mason University, Stanford University, and UCLA.

Ruth Wisse

Ruth Wisse

Recently retired from her position as Martin Peretz Professor of Yiddish Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvard, Ruth Wisse is currently Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Tikvah Fund. Dr. Wisse’s books on literary subjects include an edition of Jacob Glatstein’s two-volume fictional memoir, The Glatstein Chronicles (2010), The Modern Jewish Canon: A Journey through Literature and Culture (2003), and A Little Love in Big Manhattan (1988). She is also the author of two political studies, If I Am Not for Myself: The Liberal Betrayal of the Jews (1992) and Jews and Power (2007). Her latest book, No Joke: Making Jewish Humor, a volume in the Tikvah-sponsored Library of Jewish Ideas, was published by Princeton University Press.

Talia Katz

Talia Katz

Talia Katz was born in Atlanta, Georgia, to a father from Israel and a mother from Brooklyn. She recently graduated the University of Michigan with a degree in Public Policy and International Studies. While at the University of Michigan, Talia was a member of the American Enterprise Institute Executive Council and WeListen, a grassroots organization which aims to bridge the political divide by facilitating respectful political discussions. While living in Washington, D.C., for eight months last year, Talia interned at AIPAC, the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, and the State Department’s Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs. After completing her Summer Fellowship at the Tikvah Fund, Talia will begin a two-year fellowship program in D.C. with the Public Interest Fellowship.

Tamara Berens

Tamara Berens

Tamara Berens hails from the U.K. and recently graduated from King’s College, London, with a degree in War Studies. At university, Tamara was President of the Israel Society and founded a campaign to abolish Safe Spaces on campus. Alongside her studies, she worked part-time for CAMERA to develop student activity in support of Israel across the U.K. and Ireland. She has interned at think tanks in London and Washington, D.C., including the Institute for Economic Affairs, the Henry Jackson Society, and the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Her writing has appeared in publications such as the American Conservative, the Jerusalem Post, the National Interest, National Review Online, Standpoint, and the Weekly Standard. Tamara is one of two inaugural Krauthammer Fellows at Mosaic magazine.

Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a Professor of Classics Emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and a nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History at Hillsdale College, where he teaches courses in military history and classical culture. Among many other awards, he has been the recipient of the National Humanities Medal in 2007, and the Bradley Prize in 2008, as well as the Edmund Burke Award in 2018. Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, scholarly papers, and newspaper editorials on matters ranging from ancient Greek agrarian and military history to foreign affairs, domestic politics, and contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-four books, including, most recently, The Case for Trump.

Yoram Hazony

Yoram Hazony

Yoram Hazony is an Israeli philosopher, Bible scholar and political theorist. He is President of the Herzl Institute in Jerusalem, Chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation. and the founder and former head of the Shalem Center in Jerusalem, a research institute that conducted nearly two decades of pioneering work in the fields of philosophy, political theory, Bible, Talmud, Jewish and Zionist history, Middle East Studies and archaeology. He is also the Director of the John Templeton Foundation’s project in Jewish Philosophical Theology.

Dr. Hazony researches and writes in the fields of philosophy and theology, political theory and intellectual history. His most recent book, The Virtue of Nationalism, won the Intercollegiate Studies Institute’s Conservative Book of the Year Award in 2019. His previous books include The Philosophy of Hebrew ScriptureGod and Politics in Esther, and The Jewish State: The Struggle for Israel’s Soul. His articles and essays have appeared in publications such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Commentary, and the New Republic, among others.

He obtained his doctorate in Political Theory at Rutgers University, and was the first editor of Princeton’s conservative undergraduate student journal. He lives in Jerusalem with his wife Yael Hazony. They have nine children.